Posts Tagged ‘Gastrointestinal Tract’

Herbs To Stop Bad Breath

Kelvin Ho asked:

If you love to cook, you would love herbs. Using fresh, dried or crushed herbs in your cooking gives you a variety of flavoring choices. If you are familiar with the many uses of herbs you may already know that some everyday herbs can also be used to stop bad breath. Here are some of the following herbs commonly used as natural bad breath remedies.

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus was first used by Australian aborigines who found water in the roots of the plant growing in the outback. Inhaling the fragrant eucalyptus oil can alleviate symptoms from illness and disease that cause excessive mucus, such as sinusitis, bronchitis, asthma, emphysema and whooping cough. The major component in the eucalyptus leaf is eucalyptol which is a very strong oil. Eucalyptus oil can cause a reaction similar to menthol, in that it impacts the nasal receptors and can help relieve nasal congestion.

There are some side effects from using eucalyptus internally, such as vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea. Eucalyptus should never be used with infants or children younger than two years old, since there is a risk of causing spasm in the airways, and even breathing cessation. To be safe, you should keep it away from young children. In addition, the oil can cause bronchial spasms in people suffering from and should be avoided by anyone with severe liver disease or any other inflammation disorders of the kidney or gastrointestinal tract.

Thyme

Thyme is a very fragrant herb that comes from the Mediterranean areas of southern Europe. Today it is widely cultivated throughout the United States. When dried, the leaves or flowering tops of the plant can be used as medicine. There are many beneficial characteristics of thyme, including its ability to prevent or alleviate cough, relieve spasms, and also as a mucus thinner or expectorant. When used either alone or in combination with other herbs, thyme continues to be a very common herb used for treating dry coughs and whooping cough. It has low toxicity, so thyme can be used to treat cough even for young children.

Keep in mind that while thyme may be safe to be used as described above, any type of severe cough, especially in an infant or young child, could be a symptom of something more serious and should be brought to the attention of a physician immediately in order to determine the best treatment.

Myrrh

In the ancient world, resin of myrrh with its reddish brown color, was employed to mummify corpses, preserve mummies. Myrrh was used widely as a remedy for a variety of infections, such as syphilis and leprosy. Ancient herbal doctors also suggested myrrh to treat bad breath and to help improve dental health. Three important constituents of myrrh are the resin, the gum, and the volatile oil. These three are considered to be key to its ability to provide medicinal qualities. Another feature of myrrh is its astringent qualities, which can help sooth inflammation in the throat and mouth. When used as indicated, myrrh is a perfectly safe herb to use.

Bloodroot

Bloodroot was used widely by Native Americans for both medicine and in tribal ritual. Dye made from bloodroot was incorporated into body paint. Bloodroot was used to treat cough, sore throat, rheumatic pain, and even certain types of cancer. The active compound in bloodroot is alkaloids. These are sometimes found in toothpaste and oral hygiene products due to their characteristic of inhibiting oral bacteria. The side effects of bloodroot include vomiting and nausea if taken improperly or in too great an amount.

Caraway

Caraway has been widely used as a medicinal herb for centuries. The caraway seed helps to aid digestion but can also ease digestive colic in children. Caraway is a type of herb known as carminatives, which are plants known to be helpful in relieving gastrointestinal pains.

Caraway is usually safe for internal consumption. Avoid using the purified volatile oil for children younger than two years of age, since as an oil from an herb in the Umbelliferrae family this can cause irritation to the skin and mucous membranes.

Peppermint

Like caraway, peppermint is also classified as a carminative herb. Peppermint has been commonly used as a digestive aid, and is used to treat indigestion and intestinal colic. Tea made from peppermint is safe for normal consumption, however peppermint oil used internally can cause gastrointestinal distress for some people.

Sage

Sage has a very long history of being used as both a medicinal herb and for culinary uses. Herbalists have used it externally to treat inflammation, swelling, sprains, ulcers, and bleeding. When used internally as a tea, sage is thought to successfully relieve sore throats and coughs, and even is used as a gargle.

Convulsions may result from using large quantities of sage, meaning several times as recommended above.

Conclusion

For all herbs, you should always consult your herbalist or doctor when in doubt. Use them appropriately and you will be surprised by their results they provide you.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Sandman - February 13, 2012 at 10:30 am

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Get To Know The 7 Herbs That Are Effective For Your Bad Breath

Kelvin Ho asked:

Herbs are a necessity in the modern kitchen. You may be using fresh herbs, dry herbs or crushed herbs, depending on availability and season in your cooking. You may be astonished to learn that quite of few of the herbs can be used as a remedy for bad breath. If you are willing to try alternative remedies, these are the herbs that can help with halitosis.

Eucalyptus: This herb was originally used by the Australian aborigines who managed to get some liquid from the herbs by chewing them. It is common knowledge that the smell of eucalyptus oil helps when you have any ailment like asthma, bronchitis, emphysema and whooping cough. Eucalyptus contains a volatile oil called eucalyptol. It works in a similar way as menthol, by opening nasal passages and acting on receptors in the mucus, thus reducing the symptoms of nasal congestion.

However, this herb is best avoided internally as it can cause diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. You should not use the oil for infants under two years of age even for inhalation purposes because there is a danger or airway spasm leading to stoppage of breathing, a potentially fatal consequence. Then again the oil may increase bronchial spasms in asthmatics and should not be ingested by people with severe liver disease or any inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract or kidney.

Thyme: Found in the Mediterranean region and also cultivated in the United States, this sweet smelling herb is used in cooking. The dried or semi-dried leaves and the flowering tops are also used for their medicinal properties. It has anti-tussive (cough treating), anti-spasmodic and expectorant (thinning the mucus) actions which are of great help. Thyme can be used along or blended with other herbs like sundew and it is often used in Europe for treating dry, spasmodic coughs and also whooping cough. Because the herb is not toxic, it can be used safely with small children.

Though it is a herb which is fairly safe to use, do keep in mind that a heavy, spasmodic cough, specially in young children, may be a precursor to a more dangerous medical condition, and so do consult a medical practitioner to check for the same.

Myrrh: The reddish-brown resin of myrrh was used for preserving mummies in olden times. It found its place in the treatment of infectious diseases like leprosy and syphilis in ancient times. Herbalists and naturalist also suggest this herb as a remedy for bad breath and other dental problems. Resin, gum and volatile oil form the three main constituents of myrrh. These contribute to its efficacy. It is also known for its astringent properties and it has a calming effect on inflamed tissues which may be present in the mouth and throat. It is usually safe to use.

Bloodroot: This herb was used by Native Americans in rituals and in medicines. Its color was used as body paint. Bloodroot was used to treat cough, sore throats, rheumatic pains and even cancer. The main active compounds in this herb are alkaloids-primarily sanguinarine. Some toothpastes and other oral hygiene products may contain these because they are supposed to hinder bacteria growth.

Bloodroot should be used with caution because it can cause nausea and vomiting if it is taken in large doses.

Caraway: This herb has been used medically for centuries. Its seeds help in digestion and also aid in easing colic pain, especially in children. It is a carminative; therefore it is used in helping gastrointestinal discomfort.

It is generally safe for internal use when ingested. However, oil from caraway and other herbs in the Umbelliferrae family are volatile and may cause irritation to the skin and mucous membranes. Do not use the oil for children under two years.

Peppermint: This herb, too, is carminative. Its digestive properties are common knowledge and it widely used for indigestion and intestinal colic pains.

Though peppermint tea is usually considered safe for regular drinking, the same cannot be said for peppermint oil which can cause burning and gastrointestinal upset in some people.

Sage: It has historically been used as a culinary and medicinal herb for times immemorial. It has been used externally to treat swelling, sprains, bleeding and ulcers by herbalists. Tea from sage leaves has been used for treating coughs and sore throat and even used as a gargle.

A word of caution: extremely high amounts of sage can be a causative factor in convulsions.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Sandman - December 22, 2011 at 6:59 am

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Lactose Intolerance Can Cause Bad Breath

Kelvin Ho asked:

Bad breath is a common condition that many people face throughout the world. It is also a very sought after topic among individuals of all ages.

There are different factors that account for the development of bad breath and hence different solutions are needed to combat it. In this article we are going to understand the connection between bad breath and lactose intolerance.

First of all we have to understand what lactose intolerance is? Firstly, lactose is a sugar, which is found in milk and other dairy products. After these foods are eaten, the lactose will be metabolized (broken down) by an enzyme known as lactase.

Unfortunately, sometimes the body does not produce lactase or there is decreased production of lactase in the body. When this happens, it will result in gastric problems and the lactose will not be broken down in the gastrointestinal tract.

When the lactose is not broken down due to the absence of the enzyme lactase, this will result in symptoms which are similar to stomach virus and hence it is difficult to discern whether the person is suffering from lactose intolerance or stomach flu.

Usually, it is only through examining each individual’s medical history and different tests that it is determined that the culprit is lactose intolerance. If you suspect that you are suffering from lactose intolerance, do share with your doctor the list of specific foods that cause you to feel uncomfortable. This will help your doctor to make a diagnosis sooner.

The signs and symptoms of lactose intolerance are nausea, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and an exceptionally bad breath.

These symptoms occur because the body is not accepting the lactose. Usually, the symptoms will start to clear up once the lactose is removed from the body. Among the most significant symptom is the occurrence of very foul breath. It can be so bad that your friends around you can smell it even if they are many feet away.

Typically, people would assume that the individual is suffering from poor oral hygiene but in reality the individual is suffering from lactose intolerance.

The lactose when ingested by lactose intolerant individuals results in gastric symptoms mentioned above and the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract acts upon the lactose rich foods and results in fermentation that produces foul smelling gas. This gas unfortunately is exhaled out through the lungs and that is how bad breath and lactose intolerance are connected.

The connection between lactose intolerance and halitosis can be further confirmed through a hydrogen breath test. Normally there is a very little amount of hydrogen present in the breath but in a lactose intolerant individual who has ingested lactose rich foods, the hydrogen content is going to be much higher than the normal. This shows that the lactose is not broken down properly.

After you have understood the connection between bad breath and lactose intolerance, you may be wondering how did you become lactose intolerant in the first place. That answer lies in your genes. Lactose intolerance can also occur with the advancing age. So if you find out that you are having halitosis and unable to find any apparent cause to it, then you must look into lactose intolerance as this might be the culprit causing this problem.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Sandman - October 30, 2009 at 9:41 am

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