Posts Tagged ‘Mucus’

Home Remedies for Bad Breath

james sameul asked:

Bad breath, also known as halitosis, is a very common temporary condition caused by such things as oral dryness, stress, hunger (ketosis), eating certain foods such as garlic and onions, smoking, or poor oral hygiene.

Bad breath is caused by odor-producing bacteria that grow in the mouth. When people don’t brush and floss regularly, bacteria accumulate on the bits of food left in the mouth and between the teeth. The sulfur compounds released by these bacteria make the breath smell.

Home remedies for bad breath

Brush your teeth with baking soda first, then rinse out your mouth with plain or warm, salty water. Follow this with regular toothpaste and you are on your way.

Floss your teeth daily. The gunk (plaque) between your teeth may be causing your bad breath.

Scrape your tongue with a spoon or one of those specially designed tongue scrapers. Get as far back on your tongue as possible to scrape off the offending bacteria.

Gently clean the top of your tongue with the toothbrush.

To flush away mucus and bacteria, try gargling with saltwater.

For a quick cover-up eat fresh parsley or mint, or use a mouthwash.

Tea Tree Oil, is a natural cure for bad breath when used as a toothpaste additive. Simply add a drop of the oil to your toothpaste right before you brush.

You can also create a Tea Tree Oil mouthwash by adding 3 drops of the oil to a cup of warm water. Gargle this solution two to three times a day, preferably after each meal.

Clean your sinuses. Since bad breath can be caused by any number of sinus problems, some people get relief by “washing” out the area inside your nose where the sinuses drain, says Dr. Fedok. If you want to try it, use a saline solution in a blue-ball syringe–the kind used to clean out ears. (Both the solution and the syringe are available at most pharmacies.) “you’ll have to refill the syringe several times. Spray the saline up each nostril, letting the solution drain out the other nostril and your mouth. It may take up to a pint of saline to wash out your sinuses,” says Dr. Fedok.

One more effective Home Remedy for Bad Breath is Fennel. Fennel is useful herb and can be used in many ways. Chew the leaves of this herb and allow the saliva to build up in your mouth. Or, mix the fillings of a fennel capsule with baking soda, make into a paste, and brush your teeth, gums and tongue with it. The liquid remains of fennel can be rubbed on your gums and tongue.

Cloves are a strong antiseptic. Make a tea by putting 3 whole or 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves in 2 cups of hot water, and steep for 20 minutes, stirring infrequently. Pour through a well strainer and use as a mouthwash or gargle two times in a day. This is one of the good Home Remedy for Bad Breath.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Sandman - February 23, 2013 at 11:29 pm

Categories: Diseases And Conditions   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

curing bad breath ?

bad breath cures
jazzy n asked:

okay i have bad breath and its coming from the back of my throat. i constantly have to swallow becuase of alot mucus down my throat. but everytime i spit it out theres no bad breath. i dont want to constantly use gum or mints. im really embarassed about it especially when sometimes im going to make out.

is there a condition of the constant mucus?
any easy cures for bad breath?
will the oral rinse cloysis work for me?
what types of breath fresheners will work when i make out ?
if you could help me i would appreciate it
🙂

5 comments - What do you think?  Posted by Sandman - December 13, 2012 at 3:08 am

Categories: Dental   Tags: , , , , , ,

bad breath?

bad breath
HooDIe asked:

i get bad breath sometimes. and my mouth tastes like i have alot of bacteria in it and there is mucus in my mouth when i wake up sometimes?
this is partially from post nasal drip, but what are some good methods of getting rid of bad breath?
i use scope and i brush my teeth but that doesnt help much.

Get Rid of Poop Breath

8 comments - What do you think?  Posted by Sandman - October 10, 2012 at 7:44 am

Categories: Dental   Tags: , ,

I asked this before but I really need tips?

? asked:

How do I get mucus out of my chest. I have like a flemmy cough and a really sore throat. It is basiclly bronchitis. SO how do I make myself feel better? Like medications? Or home remedies?

Bad Breath Remedy

7 comments - What do you think?  Posted by Sandman - June 26, 2012 at 3:51 pm

Categories: Respiratory Diseases   Tags: , , , ,

Get To Know The 7 Herbs That Are Effective For Your Bad Breath

Kelvin Ho asked:

Herbs are a necessity in the modern kitchen. You may be using fresh herbs, dry herbs or crushed herbs, depending on availability and season in your cooking. You may be astonished to learn that quite of few of the herbs can be used as a remedy for bad breath. If you are willing to try alternative remedies, these are the herbs that can help with halitosis.

Eucalyptus: This herb was originally used by the Australian aborigines who managed to get some liquid from the herbs by chewing them. It is common knowledge that the smell of eucalyptus oil helps when you have any ailment like asthma, bronchitis, emphysema and whooping cough. Eucalyptus contains a volatile oil called eucalyptol. It works in a similar way as menthol, by opening nasal passages and acting on receptors in the mucus, thus reducing the symptoms of nasal congestion.

However, this herb is best avoided internally as it can cause diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. You should not use the oil for infants under two years of age even for inhalation purposes because there is a danger or airway spasm leading to stoppage of breathing, a potentially fatal consequence. Then again the oil may increase bronchial spasms in asthmatics and should not be ingested by people with severe liver disease or any inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract or kidney.

Thyme: Found in the Mediterranean region and also cultivated in the United States, this sweet smelling herb is used in cooking. The dried or semi-dried leaves and the flowering tops are also used for their medicinal properties. It has anti-tussive (cough treating), anti-spasmodic and expectorant (thinning the mucus) actions which are of great help. Thyme can be used along or blended with other herbs like sundew and it is often used in Europe for treating dry, spasmodic coughs and also whooping cough. Because the herb is not toxic, it can be used safely with small children.

Though it is a herb which is fairly safe to use, do keep in mind that a heavy, spasmodic cough, specially in young children, may be a precursor to a more dangerous medical condition, and so do consult a medical practitioner to check for the same.

Myrrh: The reddish-brown resin of myrrh was used for preserving mummies in olden times. It found its place in the treatment of infectious diseases like leprosy and syphilis in ancient times. Herbalists and naturalist also suggest this herb as a remedy for bad breath and other dental problems. Resin, gum and volatile oil form the three main constituents of myrrh. These contribute to its efficacy. It is also known for its astringent properties and it has a calming effect on inflamed tissues which may be present in the mouth and throat. It is usually safe to use.

Bloodroot: This herb was used by Native Americans in rituals and in medicines. Its color was used as body paint. Bloodroot was used to treat cough, sore throats, rheumatic pains and even cancer. The main active compounds in this herb are alkaloids-primarily sanguinarine. Some toothpastes and other oral hygiene products may contain these because they are supposed to hinder bacteria growth.

Bloodroot should be used with caution because it can cause nausea and vomiting if it is taken in large doses.

Caraway: This herb has been used medically for centuries. Its seeds help in digestion and also aid in easing colic pain, especially in children. It is a carminative; therefore it is used in helping gastrointestinal discomfort.

It is generally safe for internal use when ingested. However, oil from caraway and other herbs in the Umbelliferrae family are volatile and may cause irritation to the skin and mucous membranes. Do not use the oil for children under two years.

Peppermint: This herb, too, is carminative. Its digestive properties are common knowledge and it widely used for indigestion and intestinal colic pains.

Though peppermint tea is usually considered safe for regular drinking, the same cannot be said for peppermint oil which can cause burning and gastrointestinal upset in some people.

Sage: It has historically been used as a culinary and medicinal herb for times immemorial. It has been used externally to treat swelling, sprains, bleeding and ulcers by herbalists. Tea from sage leaves has been used for treating coughs and sore throat and even used as a gargle.

A word of caution: extremely high amounts of sage can be a causative factor in convulsions.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Sandman - December 22, 2011 at 6:59 am

Categories: Uncategorized   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Next Page »